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Thread: Shutter Speed

  1. #1
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    Default Shutter Speed

    I recall Paul telling me to try and get my shutter speed up to 100. When I got my pic of the Red Capped Parrot, I only had a shutter speed of 50. It was early morning and the sun was only just rising so the light wasn't good. I tried upping the iso when I got a pic of the WF Chat the day before and it was terribly grainy. What would be the best way to up the S/S in these conditions...Thanks.
    The voices in my head may not be real, but they come up with some great ideas..

    Cheers Rev.

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    ahh Ray, it may be time for you to contemplate the use of an external flash! I was originally quite hesitant to step into the realms of flash, but with a little perserverance and plenty of practice, using flash in your photography becomes second nature. And the results in the images are terrific, can really bring an image to life.

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    Thanks Adam. I do have a flash, but was reluctant to use it in this instance, as I reckon the bird would have bolted on the first click.
    The voices in my head may not be real, but they come up with some great ideas..

    Cheers Rev.

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    In my experiences birds don't generally mind the use of flash.. on occassion I've noticed a bird react to the flash (by becoming more alert), but I don't think it scares them much more than your initial presence anyway.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Adam Blyth View Post
    In my experiences birds don't generally mind the use of flash.. on occassion I've noticed a bird react to the flash (by becoming more alert), but I don't think it scares them much more than your initial presence anyway.
    I've seen a Rufous Bristlebird jump about 2 feet in the air when Dave Stowe was photographing it using fill flash.
    Cheers,
    Geoff


    reposts welcome

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    So is a flash the only answer to my question..
    The voices in my head may not be real, but they come up with some great ideas..

    Cheers Rev.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Ray Walker View Post
    So is a flash the only answer to my question..
    Yes, pretty much Ray. If you cannot get a high enough shutter speed to freeze the bird's subtle movements and increasing ISO does not yield good results, then flash is your only other option. In this instance, it would be best to switch to manual mode and set the desired shutter speed yourself and let the flash be the main light. Only problem is, from memory, you do not have a Canon flash so you will have to take full control of the flash yourself - will most likely take a few shots to work exposure out if the bird sticks around for it!

    I have seen birds jump about 2ft in the air as well with flash; more so the shy birds. Chestnut breasted mannikins react to the flash, but usually stay put. All depends on the individual bird as to how it tolerates flash
    Aust. Life List (IOC) - 315 (Rufous Owl- 11/09/2014)
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    I can't remember saying 1/100th The general rule with handholding is to try and shoot at a shutter speed relative to your focal length. For your 400mm lens Rev I would try and shoot at 1/400th at least if possible. For a 300mm it would be 1/320th.
    With steady hands you can take sharp shots at 1/100th (especially if you burst shoot a few frames, normally one of them will be sharp).
    What ISO were you using for the shots you are talking about? With a perfectly exposed image you should be able to work at ISO values of 800+ if you like.

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    Couple of ways Rev, as allready noted crank up the iso, shoot with the lens wide open ie: f/5.6 and if your game forget about + exposure compensation and dial in - 1/3 comp if conditions suit as this will
    also have the desired effect of lifting the shutter speed. Mike

  10. The following user says thank you to Mike Toms for their reply:

    Ray Walker (14-06-2011)

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    Quote Originally Posted by Paul Randall View Post
    What ISO were you using for the shots you are talking about?
    In my first post.
    I can't remember saying 1/100th
    It was in one of my early orchid posts. ( I think it was you)
    All shots I refer to are with a tripod.
    Thanks every one.
    The voices in my head may not be real, but they come up with some great ideas..

    Cheers Rev.

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    Default

    Ahh, that makes sense now You were using a 100mm lens so thats why I said 1/100th. Thats the relative shutter speed for that focal length. Like I said, with that 7D you should be able to use quite high ISOs if you expose the image properly.

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    Ray Walker (14-06-2011)

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    Quote Originally Posted by Paul Randall View Post
    Ahh, that makes sense now You were using a 100mm lens so thats why I said 1/100th.
    Roger that...
    The voices in my head may not be real, but they come up with some great ideas..

    Cheers Rev.

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    Default

    In mathematical terms the shutter speed should be the reciprocal of the focal length being used, to ensure a sharp image. As in 500mm needs 1/500th sec. In natural light, hand held photography that is.
    Regards Keith



    .Our land abounds in Nature's gifts. Of beauty rich and rare.

  16. The following user says thank you to Keith & Judy Humphreys for their reply:

    Ray Walker (14-06-2011)

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    If you are on a tripod the rules go out the window and you roll a dice as to whether the bird will move during the exposure. The real trick with the 7D is to not under expose. If you are talking about your 400mm f5.6, don't be afraid to shoot wide open, just make sure you focus on the eye. You should be able to get away with 1/60 with OK technique and possibly lower down to 1/30th if your bird co-operates and your technique is perfect. Other than that, wait for better light, at that low brightness level, the light will be pretty flat. Flash is always a good option, but the light won't always be flattering.
    Chris Ross
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    Ray Walker (14-06-2011)

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    For when you hand hold:

    If you use a crop sensor body, multiply the focal length by the crop factor and use that number for the 1/FL shutter speed rule. Eg 300mm lens on a 7D would have a field of view equivalent to a 500mm lens --- 300x1.6 = 480 or 500 being the closest for shutter speed available to use, when hand holding. So always try to remember that.

    Failing that, you can use flash as main light, depending on circumstances and in many instances the images may not look that bad after all.

  20. The following user says thank you to Ákos Lumnitzer for their reply:

    Ray Walker (14-06-2011)

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