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Thread: FOG ON LENS

  1. #1
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    Default FOG ON LENS

    With the mornings getting colder , I am having trouble with the lens fogging up.( I missed some good shots this morning) I know you can get a coating on glasses to stop this happening. Can it be done to camera lens ?
    Thanks.
    The voices in my head may not be real, but they come up with some great ideas..

    Cheers Rev.

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    Default Re: FOG ON LENS

    Where are you when it fogs up?

    It should only fog up when you move from one envoronment that's cold/warm to the opposite.

    Gradually allow your gear to adjust to the temperatures you're taking it to. Perhaps put it in a ziplock bag. Store your gear when you're not using it with dessicant/silica (though there are two schools of thought on this last option)

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    Default Re: FOG ON LENS

    Yep, Adams spot on. If its only happening when getting in/out of the car then I would suggest you bite the bullet and keep the windows slightly ajar.

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    Default Re: FOG ON LENS

    I have my gear in a brief case in my car ,and as soon as I take camera outside and take the cap of the lens , it fogs up.
    The voices in my head may not be real, but they come up with some great ideas..

    Cheers Rev.

  5. #5
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    Default Re: FOG ON LENS

    If you've had the heater on during the drive to your destination, the temp of the camera / lens will be higher than the outside air temp. Under these circumstances, it'll fog up. Likewise if it was stored in a warm house overnight prior to being transported in car.
    Best solution may be to put it in the car on the previous night and drive to the destination without turning on car heater.
    Cheers,

    George

    Life List : 481 (Southern Cassowary, Etty Bay, QLD, Oct., 2016)

  6. #6
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    Default Re: FOG ON LENS

    I don't have the car heater on George. I keep it in a foam lined ( top and bottom) leather brief case. Maybe it is too warm and cosy in there, and I should take it out of the case and leave it on the seat over night.
    The voices in my head may not be real, but they come up with some great ideas..

    Cheers Rev.

  7. #7
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    Default Re: FOG ON LENS

    No need to leave anything in the car overnight. Just let it acclimatise in the car (out of the suitcase) on your drive to your destination.

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    Default Re: FOG ON LENS

    Yes be careful Rev this is how mould starts on the inside of lenses, Pauls suggestion is good just leave it on the seat and don't turn the heater on. Mike

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    Default Re: FOG ON LENS

    Hi Ray
    We regard ourselves as ''experts'' with fogged up lenses.
    We camp out in our campertrailer in the Mallee region of Victoria in the middle of Winter with
    temperatures getting down to minus 3 degrees overnight mostly followed by fine sunny days around
    19 degrees. Sometimes we have to wait until almost midday for the fog to clear & the sun to break
    through. We bring our cameras out fairly early as long as it's not too damp & remove the lens cap
    so as to get the initial fogging process over with before we go wandering looking for birds. The fog gradually
    shrinks from total coverage towards the centre of the prime lens. Early morning is not the time to be
    changing lenses as this lets in moisture & the camera's mirror can also fog up. The worst thing that
    you can do is wipe a fogged up lens, it's better to let it defog naturally with the ambient temperature.
    Hope this assists any readers of this thread.
    Regards Keith


    Our land abounds in Natures gifts, of beauty rich & rare.

    Life list total (seen by both of us) 447 Latest sighting: Rufous Owl Darwin Botanical Gardens 22-9-17


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    Default Re: FOG ON LENS

    Ahhh, I knew there would be some experts out there. Good advice from Keith and Judy

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    Default Re: FOG ON LENS

    Thanks Keith, that is very helpful. I wiped my lens this morning with a proper cloth from the optometrist shop. Roughly how long did it take to clear on it's own?
    The voices in my head may not be real, but they come up with some great ideas..

    Cheers Rev.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Ray Walker View Post
    Thanks Keith, that is very helpful. I wiped my lens this morning with a proper cloth from the optometrist shop. Roughly how long did it take to clear on it's own?
    Wiping your moist lens with an Optical cloth propably only degrades the cloth as well as smearing the lens Ray. Most of the time the lens clears fairly quickly naturally, just remove the cap well before you want to start taking shots. Judy points her lens at the Sun which defogs it even quicker. Shot of Murray -Sunset National Park, zero degree morning, fog almost cleared, ice still on the car roof, let's go chasing birds!
    Regards KeithClick image for larger version. 

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    Our land abounds in Natures gifts, of beauty rich & rare.

    Life list total (seen by both of us) 447 Latest sighting: Rufous Owl Darwin Botanical Gardens 22-9-17


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    Condensation occurs when moist air meets a cold surface. Cold moist air does not condense on a warm surface, which is why the demister in your car works.

    I regulary go out in sub zero temperatures to catch the early light and I have never had a lens condensation problem. I keep all of my gear in the house overnight where it is a lot warmer than being left in the car. I also put the heater on in the car. The camera and lens eventually get cold once I'm in the field of course, but they never get as cold as the surrounding air so I never get any lens condensation.

    Regards, Leo.

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    I am a bit confused now. When I take my camera out of a warm house into about 2 c ( which it has been for a few mornings) the lens gets fogged up instantly. It is the same with the windows of the car, they are clear in the car port, but as soon as they hit the colder air they fogs up. I guess I will have to do some trial and error.
    The voices in my head may not be real, but they come up with some great ideas..

    Cheers Rev.

  15. #15
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    This surprises me, Rev. I have been going out in the frost with long and short lenses for 8 years now. I just love the beauty of a frost. I have never had your problem. However, if I happen to breath on the viewfinder whilst looking for birds, it fogs up and I can't see a thing through it. I guess, if you happened to breath on your lens the same thing would happen. Also, when I walk over to the local heated swimming pool early in the morning my glasses fog up as soon as I enter the pool area, but not whilst walking over there.
    Margaret Leggoe
    Never too old to learn.

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