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Thread: A flash failure

  1. #16
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    Looking at this again, with fresh eyes, your very best shot is the unflashed one, the BG is as good as you'll get IMO in those conditions, the bird's nicely exposed, the BG is not too obtrusive, if want to spice it with some fill, just use TTL with -2 flash compensation at the slow shutter speed you have, probably want second curtain sync in case the bird reacts to the flash. Using a slow shutter speed like that is perfectly valid in low light conditions as long as you have solid support under your lens. In fact this photographer who I've shot with on a number of occasions does not use flash for many shots under the rainforest canopy:

    http://confoley.com/gallery/

    The Pitta and kingfisher shots are unflashed and shutter speed is very low for example:

    https://www.naturescapes.net/forums/...36132#p2136132
    https://www.naturescapes.net/forums/...20081#p2120081
    https://www.naturescapes.net/forums/...53867#p2053867

    On your shot a levels tweak to pull in the black and white points improves it quite a bit.
    Chris Ross
    Helensburgh NSW
    www.aus-natural.com
    Instagram: @ausnaturalimages

  2. #17

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    It turns out you can get such pictures without a flash! Tell me, where can I read more about this?

  3. #18
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    Jul 2014
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    St Clair, NSW
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    You mean a picture in relative darkness without flash? Going to mean one of 2 things, either high ISO or a slow shutter speed. The above 3 examples use a relatively high iso and also slow shutter speeds, at ISO6400 and 1 sec shutter speed the Frogmouth shot would of had to be pretty darn dark!
    All you really need is something rock solid to mount your camera on (tripod or maybe a beanbag) and a remote release (can also use the timed shutter release but that gets tedious rather quick). And ofcource you need a subject that sits still through the whole exposure.

    Once tested it with the kingfisher from the first shot of the thread, lowish ISO and let the shutter speed go where it wanted..think it ended up near the 1 second. Even the tiniest little motion would result in blur, to the point where I could tell of the bird had taken a breath during the exposure, everything sharp but the chest feathers.

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