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Thread: On Cloning Close to Subjects

  1. #1
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    Default On Cloning Close to Subjects

    When you clone backgrounds in photoshop you dont want to see any 'edges' so you use a very 'soft' setting usually 0 hardness with the clone tool. Problem with this is 'overspray' from the soft clone brush contaminating your subject if you get too close.
    An answer ( forget where I first saw this )
    1) Make duplicate layer from the background layer you are working on ( CNTRL +J )
    2) Make new copy layer invisible - deselect eye icon at left of layer.
    3) Select bottom /background layer, clone away with a soft brush, dont worry if you clone over subject matter you later want.
    4) When happy with cloning result select duplicate / top layer, make it visible, all your hard cloning work vanishes
    5) Apply a black layer mask to the duplicate layer your cloning ( complete with over sprayed subject ) reappears
    6) Select a brush of suitable size and hardness,100% opacity select white as the colour, ie press D - default, pressing X if necessary to get white on top of the little icons bottom left in PS.
    7) Paint on the mask with white carefully over your subject to reveal it uncontaminated by clonal overspray, if you go to far press X and repaint mask a bit with your now black brush.

    Hopefully I have expressed this with enough clarity so it can be followed. A great technique when required to preserve subjects from the clone tool
    Kind regards Trevor.

    Website: www.trevormurrayphotography.com

  2. #2
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    I use a different technique, I tend to use a hard (100%) clone brush because I don't want to have to deal with overspray. When cloning out something crossing the subject if it is available I will use the healing brush to clone placing the selection dead centre over the subject edge then clone the clean BG and the subject edge together, sometimes have to give it a few goes to get the edges to line up. The healing brush will cause spill from a different toned boundary if you get too close the trick is to alternate use of healing and clone brushes.
    Chris Ross
    Helensburgh NSW
    www.aus-natural.com
    Instagram: @ausnaturalimages

  3. #3
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    Thanks for posting guys. Little tips like this are great for alot of members to learn more thankyou.
    I use a bit from column A and a bit from column B
    Another method is selection some of the background, then copying and pasting it as a new layer and moving it over the offending bit. you can manipulate it from there including using some of the tricks above but it is often good as a starting point and minimizes alot of cloning repetition etc.
    Cheers, Dave

    www.davidstowe.com.au WORKSHOPS

    Aus Life List IOC= 684 - Grey Honeyeater
    "So God created every winged bird according to its kind. And God saw that it was good." Genesis 1:21


  4. #4
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    I also use the same method Dave has described. It is important to make a good selection of your subject, save the selection, and set it on its own layer before you start doing anything to the bg. This protects it from whatever may happen whilst you do your cloning/patching work.
    Margaret Leggoe
    Never too old to learn.

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